Tian Tan Buddha (Lantau Island, Hong Kong)

Tian Tan Buddha Statue

The majestic Big Buddha statue, sitting atop the peak of 479 m. high Mount Muk Yue, is sited near Po Lin Monastery.  At ground level, the statue was quite a formidable and imposing sight. Together with many other tourists, we were huffing and puffing on our way up, only catching our breath at a number of stair landings. The view of Lantau Island, the 934 m. (3,064 ft.) Lantau Peak and the South China Sea from the top was ’breathtaking.

This large bronze statue of Buddha Shakyamuni, a major center of Buddhism in Hong Kong and a popular tourist attraction, symbolizes the harmonious relationship between man and nature, people and faith.  The statue, skillfully mastered and conceptualized by the artist to shape the perfect design of the Buddha statue that we see today, was a culmination of the characteristics of Buddhist sculptural art of the Sui and Tang Dynasties (when Buddhism was at its prime).

Taking 12 years to plan and build, this bronze Buddha statue, an outstanding piece in Buddhist sculptural art in recent history, is now a major landmark in Hong Kong attracting numerous local and overseas Buddhists and visitors.  It symbolizes the stability of Hong Kong, prosperity of China and peace on earth.

The author at the foot of the stairs leading up to the Buddha

The Big Buddha Statue, combining traditional bronze art with modern science and technology, embodies the harmonious resonance of Buddhist spirit and modern civilization – a solemn epitome of human beings’ continuous and unyielding pursuit of moral happiness and peace on earth.

Grace (near left), Cheska (fifth from left), Bryan (sixth from left) and Kyle (right) making their way up the stairs

Here’s the timeline of the statues construction:

  • In 1974, the government granted Po Lin Monastery 6,567 sq. m. of land in Mount Muk Yue, at a nominal premium, for the building of the Buddha statue.
  • On December 26, 1981, the Committee for the Construction of the Tian Tan Buddha Statue was formally established, by Po Lin Monastery, to coordinate the project, including the artistic design and concept of the statue, building materials and details of construction.
  • On April 1982, the work on the 1:5 scale, 5 m. high plaster model of the statue, fashioned by Ms. Hou Jinhui of the Guangzhou Institute of Fine Arts, was started.
  • On February 1984, the plaster model was completed, the draft of which had been revisited eight times, following discussions and consultations with the artist responsible for the conceptual design of the statue.
  • On September 26, 1986, the plaster model of the statue was shipped to Nanjing from Guangzhou.
  • On April 1989, the bronze pieces were transported to Hong Kong by sea.
  • On October 13, 1989, the last bronze piece of the statue was put in place and a solemn topping ceremony was held on the same day.
  • On December 29, 1993, which the Chinese reckon as the day of the Buddha’s enlightenment, the statue was inaugurated, with monks from around the world invited to the opening ceremony. Also taking part in the proceedings were distinguished visitors from mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, India, Japan, Korea, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Sri Lanka, and the United States.

Halfway up the stairs

The project was divided into six stages, with Nanjing Chengguang Machinery Plant of the China Astronautics Science and Technology Consultant Corporation principally carrying out the actual casting, finishing and assembly of the Buddha statue.  During the overall project design stage, over 5,000 drawings and 300 technical documents were produced within less than three months. The daily and monthly work progress for the subsequent three years was mapped out and prepared by system analysis.

The enlargement, carried out by the technical staff through a special “survey-controlled box enlargement method,” involved the use of stereoscopic photography to find out the position of the statue in space.  When over 3,900 coordinate points were established, the computer was then used to calculate the enlargement. At the same time, to form the inner frame of the statue, a traditional method of using boxes which were stacked up in layers was used. Then plaster was applied to the outer surface, producing a 1:1 scale model.

 

The body of the statue, cast in 202 bronze pieces after careful studies and surveying, was supported by an inner steel framework and fixed by connecting bolts. Auxiliary supports were used to connect the bronze pieces to the main framework.  The bronze pieces had thicknesses ranging from 10 to 13 mm. and the error margin of each cast piece was less than 3 mm..  Precision molds were prepared according to the different shapes of the pieces.

Halfway up the stairs

After overcoming numerous difficulties, the professional staff, in an effort to portray fully the splendor of Buddha Sakyamuni and to achieve a perfect artistic design, managed to finally cast the face of the Buddha in a single piece. To rehearse for the on-site assembly, a trial assembly was carried out in the plant where any problems that might occur on site were detected and solved.

View of Po Lin Monastery

The Buddha statue was trial assembled separately in three sections (upper, middle and the lower) and various necessary adjustments and trimmings were made to the bronze pieces plus initial mechanical finishing was also carried out.

Jandy with the Big Buddha in the background

 

On arrival at Lantau Island, the very large face piece and two other large bronze pieces were safely transported up to Mount Muk Yue with the help of the Transport Department who provided a large lorry and two large cranes (which sandwiched the lorry in the middle) for this arduous journey up the winding and narrow roads on the island. The arduous task of assembly and welding (the length of weld was over 5 kms.) of the statue was carried out, in open air, from bottom upwards in eight layers.

To ensure that the Buddha statue would not be damaged by strong winds, calculations on the wind pressure, imposed load and material strength of the various parts of the statue were conducted the specialists using computers and the Beijing Institute of Aerodynamics specially created a testing model, utilizing the wind tunnel employed for satellites and rockets, to conduct unidirectional as well as multi-directional wind tests on the statue as a whole and on the various parts.

The Offering of the Six Devas

The optimal coating for the surface coloring of the statue, carefully studied for over a year, was selected from various formulas for surface coloring.  Oozing an air of classical simplicity and solemn dignity, it is not susceptible to fading because of corrosion due to the exposure to the elements.

One of the halls inside the podium

Here are some interesting trivia regarding the statue:

  • The design of the statue was based on the 32 laksanas (“physical marks” of the Buddha as described in the sutras).
  • The Tian Tan Buddha is one of the five large Buddha statues in China and is the biggest sitting Buddha statue built outdoor.
  • The statue was named The Big Buddha because its base is a model of the Earthly Mount of Tian Tan (or Altar of Heaven), the Temple of Heaven in Beijing.
  • Enthroned on a lotus on top of a three-platform altar, it is surrounded by six smaller bronze statues known as “The Offering of the Six Devas,” symbolizing the Six Perfections of generosity, morality, patience, zeal, meditation and wisdom, all of which are necessary for enlightenment.  They are posed offering flowers, incense, lamp, ointment, fruit and music to the Buddha.
  • Every feature of the Buddha statue has a symbolic meaning of religious significance. The face, measuring 4.3 m. by 5.8 m., with a thickness of 13 mm. and a weight of 5 metric tons, was modeled after the Buddha Vairocana of the Longmen Grottoes for its fullness and serene beauty. The clothes and headgear had their inspiration from the soft and smooth flowing lines of the Buddha Sakyamuni image in Cave 360 of the Mogao Caves.
  • For the building of the Buddha statue, the original idea was to use reinforced concrete. However, due to artistic requirements, structural problems as well as the anticipated difficulties in quality and cost control, bronze was finally chosen as the building material.
  • The Big Buddha is 34 m. (112 ft.) tall, weighs over 250 metric tons (280 short tons) and was constructed from 202 bronze pieces.
  • Reputedly the figure can be seen across the bay from as far away as Macau on a clear day.
  • In addition to its exterior components, there is a strong steel framework inside to support the heavy load.
  • Visitors have to climb 268 steps to reach the Buddha. However, to accommodate the handicapped, the site also features a small winding road for vehicles.
  • The Buddha’s raised right hand represents the removal of affliction while the left hand, resting open on his lap, is in a gesture of generosity.
  • The statue faces north, which is unique among the great Buddha statues, as all others face south.
  • One of the statue’s most renowned features inside is a relic of Gautama Buddha, consisting of some of his alleged cremated Only visitors who purchase an offering for the Buddha are allowed to see the relic, entering to leave it there.
  • On October 18, 1999, the Hong Kong Post Office issued a definitive issue of landmark stamps, of which the HK$2.50 value depicts The Big Buddha.
  • In 2000, the Big Buddha Statue was elected as the fourth of the 10 Engineering Wonders in Hong Kong (the others, all public works projects, are the Lantau Link, the Hong Kong International Airport Passenger Terminal and the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre Extension). Of the projects in the private sector, the Big Buddha Stature came as the first.
  • On May 22, 2012, it was also featured on the HK$3 value of the Five Festival set, this one celebrating the birth of Sakyamuni Buddha. The MTR corporation also issued a souvenir ticket featuring a photograph of the statue.

View of Lantau Island and South China Sea

There are three floors beneath the statue – Hall of the Universe, Hall of Benevolent Merit and Hall of Remembrance.   In the show room, there’s a huge carved bell, inscribed with images of Buddhas and designed to ring every 7 minutes, 108 (symbolizing the release of 108 kinds of human vexations) times a day.

View of Lantau Peak

Tian Tan Buddha: Ngong Ping Rd., Ngong PingLantau Island, Hong Kong. The Buddha (as well as Po Lin Monastery) are open daily, 10 AM to 5 PM. Access to the outside of the Buddha is free of charge, but there is an admission fee to go inside the Buddha.

How to Get There: Visitors can reach the site by bus or taxi, travelling first to Mui Wo (also known as “Silvermine Bay”) via ferry from the Outlying Islands piers in Central (pier No. 6) or to Tung Chung station via the MTR, or via the 25-min. Ngong Ping 360 gondola lift between Tung Chung and Ngong Ping. Visitors may then travel to and from the Buddha via the Mui Wo ↔ Ngong Ping (NLB No. 2) and Tung Chung ↔ Ngong Ping (NLB No. 23) bus routes.

Ngong Ping Piazza (Lantau Island, Hong Kong)

New Pai Lau of Ngong Ping Piazza

During our cable car ride to Ngong Ping Village, we already saw the huge Tian Tan Buddha (also called the Big Buddha) statue sitting on the side of the mountain and, after our return from our visit to Tai O Fishing Village, we proceeded to go there.  Along the way, we had to traverse the length of the 1.5-hectare Ngong Ping Piazza.

The author at Bodhi Path

The piazza, where visitors could get started and tour to observe the religions and nature of Ngong Ping, connects with Po Lin Monasterythe Big BuddhaNgong Ping Cable CarNgong Ping Village and the Wisdom Path, a landing with 38 impressive, 8-10 m. high wooden rectangular beams, each beam inscribed with Chinese scriptures that  make up the prayers of the Heart Sutra, one of the most popular Buddhist prayers.

Check out “Po Lin Monastery, Tian Tan Buddha, Ngong Ping 360 and Ngong Ping Village

This intensely Buddhist piazza has four main components – New Pai Lau (built to reflect the northern architectural style of Qing Dynasty); Bodhi Path; Di Tan (Altar of Earth); and a Chinese landscaped garden constructed to echo with the design of Po Lin Monastery.

Stone statue of General Mihira

As we left Ngong Ping Village, we walked through the New Pai Lau, the towering ornamental archway to Bodhi Path, the central walkway paved with lotus tiles, where we were surrounded by Chinese structures that emit an aura of antiquity, appreciating the stone statues of the 1.8 m. high “Twelve Divine Generals” (each weighing about 1 ton) as well as 40 lotus-shaped stone lanterns installed on both sides.

Stone statue of General Anila

The “Twelve Divine Generals,” the protectors of the Healing Buddha, are also guardians of the hours of the day, each responsible for a two-hour period.

Di Tan at Ngong Ping Piazza

In addition, they represent the twelve Chinese zodiac signs, as denoted by the different zodiac signs on their crowns. Di Tan, the open space of Po Lin Monastery, is primarily tiled with grey granite paving. The four lotus ponds, built on the perimeter, facilitate the staging of religious ceremonies and rituals held from time to time.

Tai O Fishing Village (Lantau Island, Hong Kong)

Entrance to Tai O Fishing Village

From the Ngong Ping Village, we walked towards the bus terminal and boarded Bus 21 which leaves about every hour or so for Tai O (Chinese: 大澳) Fishing Village, a short 15-min. (6.7- km). drive via the Lantau Trail Section 4 and Tai O Rd.

Check out “Ngong Ping Village

This quaint and picturesque fishing town is partly located on an island of the same name on the western side of Lantau Island in Hong Kong. Despite damage by a large fire in July 2000, Tai O is still a tourist spot for both foreigners and residents of other parts of Hong Kong.

The village’s name, meaning “large inlet,” refers to the outlet for Tai O Creek and Tai O River which merges as it moves through Tai O. On the southwest part of Lantau Island, the Tai O River splits to the north (as Tai O Creek) and west.  At this fork lies the island referred to as Tai O.

The village is located mostly on the banks of the Tai O River. Two pedestrian bridges cross the river on its northern and western forks. The western and northern parts of the island, facing the South China Sea, are uninhabited.

For a short time, Tai O was once occupied by Portuguese during the Battle of Tamao (a naval battle, in 1521, where the Ming imperial navy defeated a Portuguese fleet led by Diogo Calvo).

Souvenir items

In 1729, a fort was built at nearby Fan Lau  to protect shipping on the Pearl River. When the British came to Hong Kong, Tai O was then known as a village of the Tanka, a community of fisher folk who’ve, for generations, built their houses on stilts above the tidal flats of Lantau Island.

Dried squid

During and after the Chinese Civil War, Tai O became a primary entry point for illegal immigration for those (mostly Cantonese) escaping from the People’s Republic of China, some of whom stayed in Tai O.  Tai O also attracted people from other Hong Kong ethnic groups, including Hoklo (Hokkien) and Hakka.

Dried fish

Tai O used to be a very important trading and fishing port, but this is a thing of the past. Currently, while many residents still continue to fish, the fishing lifestyle in Tai O is dying out as it barely provides a subsistence income. Though there is a public school on the island, most of its young people move away when they come of age.  Today, tourism seems to be Tai O’s drawcard with the Stilt Village it’s biggest attraction.

The harbor

Upon arrival at the bus terminus, we walked towards the lively, traditional seafood market.  A feast for the eyes (but, perhaps, not the nose), we strolled through its stalls and alleys, checking out the live seafood tanks and the vast array of dried traditional salted fishshrimp paste, XO sauce, salted egg yolk, laogong bin (husband cake), vegetables (some of which we did not recognize), knick knacks and souvenirs (pearl jewelry) being sold at storefronts.

Boarding our kaido

At the booth of Tai O Boat Excursion Limited, we boarded one its kaidos (small ferry boats that accommodates around 10-12 people) that would take us on an approximately 20-min. tour (which we booked beforehand online) along the river, for a close up view, of activity surrounding the harbor and the daily life in the stilt houses and, then, for a short jaunt into the sea.

Stilt houses along the river

Our ride first took us for a look at the stilt houses (pang uks) right over the waterway. In spite of the houses’ dilapidated look, the village is still a quite scenic and enchanting photographer’s paradise.

The unusual but traditional stilt houses, with its pretty setting on the coast framed by the mountains, is predominant of the old Southern Chinese fishing villages and one of the few remaining places where you can still see them in Hong Kong.

Sun Ki Bridge

All interconnected, they form a tightly knit community that literally lives on the water. There are also cafes and restaurant alongside the river plus some old house boats.

Tai Chung Bridge

After riding around the stilt village, our boat then headed out to the harbor and open sea. Before heading out to sea, we passed underneath the Tai Chung Bridge, a manually operated steel pedestrian drawbridge spanning the narrow creek dividing the town which replaced, in October 1996, a  rope-drawn “ferry,” tended by local Tanka women for over 85 years, which used to be quite popular with visitors. The Sun Ki Bridge, completed in 1979, also connects the village to the mainland.

A pair of fishing boats

As we cruised along the harbor, we saw fishermen coming and going and cleaning and putting away catch and gear, all traces of what this active fishing port used to be. Out at sea, we saw some some beautiful cliffs and rock formations along the coastline of Lantau Island.

The coastline of Lantau Island

Many tourists also come to Tai O to see the sunset and, specifically, to take boat trips to see rare, endangered Chinese white dolphins (also known as “Pink Dolphins”) but it was too early for the former and we didn’t see any of the latter. From afar, we espied the Hong Kong–Zhuhai–Macau Bridge (HZMB), the cross-border mega bridge linking Lantau with Macau and Zhuhai which, incidentally, official opened on that day.

Hong Kong–Zhuhai–Macau Bridge (HZMB)

Though Tai O is known as the “Venice of Hong Kong” or “Venice of the Orient,” don’t expect too much of a comparison as its stilt house architecture is a far cry from that of the famous and romantic Italian city.

The author

With Lantau Island becoming much more accessible, through new transportation options, and the new influx of tourists to the Big Buddha and Ngong Ping area, things in Tai O are changing fast.  Though still very much a quaint fishing village, sooner or later Tai O cannot escape the inevitable phase of development that is bound to come. Still, Tai O was definitely worth the trip from Hong Kong.

How to Get There:

  • From Central, take the ferry from Central Pier 6 to Mui Wo, then Bus No. 1 to Tai O bus terminus. The bus journey takes approximately 50 minutes.
  • From Kowloon, the easiest way is to get there is taking the MTR to Tung Chung Station, then Bus No. 11 to Tai O. From Tung Chung Station Exit B, take Ngong Ping Cable Car to Ngong Ping Village (approximately 25 minutes) then take Bus No. 21 (HK$6.6 on weekdays, for single journeys, and HK14 on Sundays and public holidays) to Tai O terminus (approximately 20 minutes). Sometimes Bus No. 21 fills up quick so, instead of waiting for the next one, consider a taxi (the taxi stands are right next to the bus stop). The taxi ride costs about HK50.At the terminus, walk for around five minutes to the steel drawbridge and then take a stroll along the waterfront.
  • By New Lantau Bus, Tai O can be reached from Mui Wo(Bus No. 1, HK$12 on weekdays, for single journeys, and HK20 on Sundays and public holidays), Tung Chung (Bus No. 11, HK$12 on weekdays, for single journeys, and HK120 on Sundays and public holidays) and Ngong Ping (Bus No. 21).
  • There are ferry piers on Tai O, close to Tai O bus terminus. It operates daily as the following routes connecting Tai O with Tuen Mun(Tuen Mun Ferry Pier, service by Fortune Ferry), Tung Chung (Tung Chung New Development Ferry Pier, service by Fortune Ferry) and Sha Lo Wan (operated by Fortune Ferry).

Tai O Fishing Village: Lantau Island, Hong Kong. Boat rides are offered by the locals and you will have no trouble getting on one.  As soon as you get off the bus or as you walk around the market, you will find somebody peddling their services. The boats depart from many points, including the bridge and the main marina, but they all cover the same main spots.  Prices for the boat rides are negotiable.  You are expected to pay about HK20 per adult (half for children) but, the bigger your group, the more leverage you will have.

Ngong Ping Village (Lantau Island, Hong Kong)

Ngong Ping Village.  In the background in Lantau Peak while on the right is the Tian Tan Buddha (Big Buddha)

The terminus of our 5.5-km. long Ngong Ping 360 cable car ride  was Ngong Ping Village (Chinese: 昂坪; pinyin: Ángpíng; Jyutping: ngong4 ping4), located on a highland in the western part of Lantau IslandHong Kong. Lantau Peak, the second highest peak of Hong Kong, is at its southeast.

Check out “Ngong Ping 360

The arched entrance to Ngong Ping Village

When we arrived at the village, “360 Ultimate Masters Face-off: Shaolin vs Emei” kung fu show (running from September 29 to October 28) was ongoing.

360 Ultimate Masters Face-off

Featuring kung fu masters from Shaolin and Emei, they performed a marvelous mock up of a vigorous battle featuring three new weapons – the meteor hammer of Shaolin and the fans (an offensive and a defensive weapon) and long-tasselled sword (an aggressive but flexible weapon) of Emei.

Long-tasselled sword

The kung fu of Shaolin is said to be strong and powerful while Emei emphasizes softness and flexibility in their moves. Their battle is a fusion of Yin (Emei) and Yang(Shaolin).

Fans of the Emei

The fairly new Ngong Ping Village, created at the top of the Ngong Ping plateau, was opened in 2005 together with other facilities and tourist attractions that include the Walking with the Buddha (Stage 360), the Monkey’s Tale Theatre and Ngong Ping Tea House, all built to accommodate the influx of tourists now flocking to the Tian Tan Buddha (or Big Buddha) and the Ngong Ping Cable Car.

Monkey’s Tale Theater

This well appointed, 1.5-hectare open-air and culturally-themed village, built at along a “tourist corridor,” serves as the central point for the many highlights and tourist attractions in the area.

Blessing Drums

It has modern facilities, 6,000 sq. m. of shop space and an 18,600 sq. m. piazza between the cable car terminal and the Po Lin Monastery (a youth hostel is located near here), a quick 5-minute walk from the Village. A visit to the Tai O Fishing Village is a short 15-minute ride away from Ngong Ping Village.

Walking With Buddha Show Theater

This tourist trap is complete with a wide array of “themed” souvenir shops, tea houses as well as fast food outlets (Subway, Starbucks, etc.) offering both Western and Asian fare. Monkey’s Tale Theater and the Walking with Buddha Show are short 15-minute audio-visual, multimedia attractions that recount Buddha‘s legends and stories.  We chose to skip these shows and save on the extra ticket costs.

Monkey’s Tale Theater

It also serves as a transportation hub. The nearby Public Transport Interchange has bus lines and taxis for easily getting around to other parts of Lantau.

For visitors who expect to see something more “genuine” and less “commercialized,” it is, by no means, an “old village.” Though built in the old traditional Chinese architectural designs to mirror and uphold the cultural and spiritual veracity of the Ngong Ping area, it has somewhat of a theme park atmosphere and this is what disappoints some visitors. Unless you need to eat (we had a late lunch here), this was an attraction not particularly worth spending time at.

Ngong Ping Village: 111 Ngong Ping Rd, Lantau Island, Hong Kong.cChinese New Year, Christmas and the three days of Buddha’s birthday are among the most crowded days.

How to Get There:  Ngong Ping Village is connected, via the Ngong Ping Cable Car, to the Tung Chung lower terminal which is linked via the Tung Chung Station MTR to the rest of Hong Kong.

 

Ngong Ping 360 (Hong Kong)

On board the Ngong Ping 360 cable car.  L-R: Bryan, the author, Kyle, Jandy, Cheska and Grace

Our fourth day in Hong Kong was reserved for Ngong Ping 360, which consists of a continuous circulating bi-cable aerial ropeway gondola lift system (referred to by its operators as a “cable car”) ride and a themed Ngong Ping Village, plus its nearby sites such as the Tian Tan Buddha (Big Buddha), Po Lin Monastery, and the Tai O Fishing Village .

Check out “Ngong Ping Village” and “Tai O Fishing Village

The long queue for tickets at Tung Chung Terminal

From Yau Ma Tei Station, we all took the Tsuen Wan line to Lai King where we transferred to the Tung Chung line (Orange Line) and got off at Tung Chung Station. As we all had an Octopus card (their equivalent of Singapore’s EZ-link card) plus Cheska easily found our way around on the MTR, getting there was a breeze. The whole trip took all of 40 mins., passing 9 stations along the way.

Getting our passes at the exclusive Klook VIP counter

Once we got to Tung Chung station, we followed the signage out of the station (Exit B).  Past Citygate Outlets, we found the Ngong Ping 360 cable car terminal. When we got there, the queue was long, with long waiting times, for those purchasing tickets on the spot even if this this was on a Wednesday afternoon. I could only imagine how bad it can get during peak periods. Lucky for us, Cheska used Klook to get us cheaper cable car tickets.  At the Klook VIP counter, she simply flashed the e-voucher to redeem our physical ticket.

At the shorter queue for Crystal Cabin passengers

Once again, in order to avoid long queues, Cheska got us round trip tickets costing HK$210 each on Klook versus HK$255 on the official Ngong Ping 360’s website (tickets available two weeks in advance) which Cheska found reliable and easy to use, especially with her mobile app.

A set of cable cars

Her choice of the crystal cabin (the cable car with a glass bottom) was deliberate as the snaking queue for the standard, non-glass-bottomed cabin, though a fair bit cheaper, tended to be far longer. This turned out to be true. Both sets of cabins circulate on the same cable but their passengers are segregated by queuing systems at both terminals.

Kyle seated on the transparent, 3-layer, 5 cm. thick glass bottom of our cable car

Past the queue, we got on the cable car.  As they usually try to fit in about 7–8 people per cabin (and standing room for another 7) and our group was smaller than that, a couple joined us in our cabin.

Yat Tung Estate on Lantau Island

It was to be a 25-minute, 5.7-km. (3.5 mi.) ride to Ngong Ping Village.  The system has a capacity of 3,500 people per hour in each direction.

Ngong Ping Cable Car Angle Station

The lift system runs across eight towers (including the stations) with five of the towers located within the country park. From Tung Chung Terminal, our cable car ran across Tung Chung Bay to Airport Island Angle Station on Chek Lap Kok, where it turns through about 60 degrees before returning across Tung Chung Bay.

Ngong Ping 360’s magnificent views

It then ran up the Lantau North Country Park to another angle station near Nei Lak Shan (Nei Lak Shan Angle Station), before finally descending to the Ngong Ping Terminal.

Hong Kong International Airport

It changed direction twice at the two angle stations, one on the south shore of Chek Lap Kok; the other west of Nei Lak Shan within the Lantau North Country Park.

Boardwalk at Lantau North Country Park

Waterfall at Lantau North Country Park

During the 25 minute journey, we had a stunning bird’s eye view, from our windows as well as from our transparent, three-layer 5 cm. thick glass floor, over the verdant landscape of North Lantau Country Park, the South China Sea, the southern shore of Hong Kong International Airport, the Tung Chung valley, Ngong Ping Plateau and surrounding terrain and waterways. As we approached Ngong Ping, we saw The Big Buddha and the Po Lin Monastery.

Kaido cruising Tung Chung Bay

Ngong Ping Cable Car: Runs daily, 10 AM to 6 PM.